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Lion relocation success: Somkhanda lions reveal their cubs

Four cubs have been spotted recently, sticking closely to their mom, at Somkhanda Community Game Reserve in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. This is a true success story around wild lion and their translocation to one of the only community-owned reserves in the country.

Opinion: Elephants damage only 1% of Hwange’s vegetation

One of the main motivations for killing elephants in Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe is the argument that they destroy the plants and this is accepted by many as a problem. Let’s discuss whether this argument is not just an excuse for proponents of culling to get more ivory for the ivory trade, or to justify higher quotas for nearby hunting areas.

Hluhluwe iMfolozi Park: Protecting the “birthplace of rhino”

Over the past few months, Hluhluwe iMfolozi Park (HiP) in KwaZulu-Natal – managed by conservation agency Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife – has been hard hit by a significant escalation in rhino poaching. Ezemvelo has subsequently been hard at work developing more effective anti-poaching and resource management strategies. In support of this, Peace Parks Foundation has committed an additional R10,6 million towards the implementation of advanced technology solutions in this sacred rhino protection area.

Fishing spiders: Small but deadly predators

A trip to Africa can sometimes provide unique sightings other than elephants, lions and antelopes. And extraordinary sightings such as a fishing spider feeding on a freshly captured Argus reed frog is one such example.

Opinion: The voice missing from the elephant trophy debate? Africans

People are likely to live with wildlife only when they have some realistic incentives to bear the costs of doing so. If wildlife doesn’t in one way or another form part of the livelihoods of people, it will inevitably make way for activities that do. For elephants, these incentives mean tourism and, yes, even trophy hunting.

Spectacular sighting: White baboon spotted in Arusha

I was driving my three-door RAV4 on the road leading to the part of the national park called ‘small Serengeti’ with Mount Meru standing majestically in front of me while I watched the nearby giraffes, zebras, baboons and buffaloes, when a brilliant flash of white caught my eye!

Rock-cut churches in Ethiopia to be documented

In Ethiopia, Christians are still today carving new, free-standing churches from solid rock faces, and now there is a project that is currently documenting this at-risk cultural practice.

Rhino horn: Recipes for disaster

In the middle of the sixth mass extinction, when 50% of the living species are at risk of extinction due to the ever growing, destructive human hands, the six rhinoceros species are at the tip of the pyramid, among the most endangered species on Earth.

Kruger: Is this the technological future?

Presently, we are able to instantly globally share everything we see and hear in Kruger and just about every other destination on earth. Animal sightings and locations are given in real time and we are able to send photos and videos across a host of social media platforms.

Marine flatworms: The butterflies of the sea

Labelled the butterflies of the sea, we often ask ourselves why are marine flatworms so vibrantly coloured? Is it simply that they can be, therefore they are? Or is there a deeper significance?

The wonderful world of nudibranchs

Nudibranchs (the naked gills) are molluscs, the flamboyant snails of the ocean. Their colours and shapes are stunning, and their multiple forms elegant and striking.

R.I.P Giraneza, the silverback gorilla

One of this year’s Photographer of the Year 2017 entrants, Nelis Wolmarans, shared with us a sombre update on the subject of the photo that got him a place in the competition finals: the silverback gorilla, Giraneza.

Our Photographer of the Year, in his own words

As the fortunate and surprised winner of the Africa Geographic Photographer of the Year competition, I considered the impact this win had on me as an amateur photographer and the opportunities this contest provides to all of us as amateur photographers.

ET the aardvark goes home

ET was found and brought to me at ZURI Orphanage in Namibia in August 2015. Small and alien-like in appearance, ET settled in quickly with life on the farm. We have a house full of cats and dogs but settling in an aardvark was a completely different experience. There is very little written about aardvark so we had to learn as we went along.

Titanic battle between squirrel and parrot

On the morning of the 30th May, I witnessed a tussle between one of the current occupants of the nest, a brown-headed parrot pair, and a tree squirrel which dared to venture too close to the nest.

The link between hunting & tourism in Namibia

I am not a hunter. Nor have I ever been. I am a vegetarian (since the age of about 11), I am part of the environmental NGO sector and I have interests in the tourism industry in Namibia. So, it might surprise you that I am a strong supporter of the hunting industry in Namibia, and indeed, throughout Africa.

South Luangwa: dog detection unit hounds poaching

In eastern Zambia, Conservation South Luangwa, in partnership with Working Dogs for Conservation and Zambia’s Department of National Parks and Wildlife has launched a fantastic initiative: Zambia’s first ever canine wildlife detection unit.

Baby elephant tragedy leads to appeal for help

At around 4:00am, 28th of August 2016, Eric Sagwe, the head ranger at Wildlife Works in the Kasigau Corridor, Kenya, received a phone call from a community member. A baby elephant had been hit by an oncoming large vehicle in Maungu.

Lion bones: SA public has no time to contest sale

South Africa is about to permit the export of lion bones to produce fake tiger wine but has given the public almost no time to object. The permit will allow an annual export of 800 skeletons to Asia.

Taking a safari to new levels

Safari report-back: My trip to Savute (Botswana) and Zimbabwe’s Hwange and Victoria Falls with Africa Geographic. By Justin Mason

SANParks responds to Kruger off-takes

In line with its approved management plan, Kruger National Park is planning to sustainably harvest some of its wildlife in order to combat the effects of drought and distribute meat to disadvantaged communities.

Leopards: The Cats of the Shadows

Leopards inhabit many habitat types – but they also inhabit a blind spot in conservation. Tough to count, we can only guess their numbers

Trophy hunting – a compromise?

Trophy hunting – the debates rage on. This analysis of the arguments put forward to justify trophy hunting makes for interesting reading

Build your own owl box!

Attracting owls to your garden is a wonderful way to marvel at these incredibly hunters of the dark. Learn how to build an owl box

Who are the Black Mambas?

The black mambas are about girl power! Find out more about the all-female anti-poaching unit that is making waves in conservation

Saving a little elephant

An elephant calf is saved after he became trapped in a dam at Phalaborwa Copper, Limpopo – thanks to the heroic team of Elephants Alive

Peter Beard and The End of the Game

A meeting with Peter Beard, author of the End of the Game – a provocative tale of the harsh reality of starvation, poaching and hunting in Kenya.

The horror of snares

Unravelling the danger of snares – the indiscriminate killer of the bushveld and a serious threat to Africa’s free-roaming wildlife

Why you should care about thickets

A thicket is a dense, almost impenetrable tangle of trees, shrubs, and vines, that is home to a host of biodiversity. Here is why you should spare a thought for thickets