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HOW CAN I HELP? is a question seldom asked in today’s self-absorbed society as we barrel along our evolutionary journey to algorithmic subserviency. Even just asking the question seems to change the chemistry of our minds, nudging us towards being decent, caring creatures. Is it too late to recalibrate to an earlier form of us?

We hope that once our new travel & conservation club has evolved out of its ‘beta’ development phase, it will be a tool to find African people and conservation projects to support. To get there, we need you. Yes, YOU. Go on, I dare you, join us on this journey and help teamAG make a difference where it matters – here in Africa. Some early-adoptors have already donated to the carefully selected projects via the club – yay!

I leave you with this thought, totally unconnected to my ramblings above: “The more chopped and packaged the animal in your freezer is, the more socially acceptable it gets.” (unknown source, altered)

Keep the passion

Simon Espley – CEO, Africa Geographic


From our Scientific Editor

Is it a bug or a beetle? If its front wings are hardened into a solid pair of wing cases (elytra), then chances are you are looking at a beetle, a member of the Coleoptera order. This is the largest of the insect orders – so far, over 400,000 different species have been discovered, about 40% of all insect species described. They range in size from the smallest free-living insect (Scydosella musawasensis just 0.3mm long) to some of the heaviest and strongest insects on the planet. Have a look at our “Did you know” fact of the week below to learn more about the astonishing size of Africa’s largest Coleoptera member.


From our Editor-in-Chief

One of the benefits of having worked in the safari industry for so many years is my body’s natural desire to wake with the dawn. A tar-thick espresso with rusk as the birds begin their morning oratorio is the perfect way to begin the day. For those not from South Africa, a rusk is a bizarre piece of confectionary that might be confused for a small brick or piece of diamond-hard, stale sweetbread. Here, it is a safari delicacy – go figure.

In our first story below, we plunge into the chasm of Mosi-oa Tunya with the raging waters of the Zambezi River. Victoria Falls is a tourism mecca boasting wildlife, adventure and stunning hospitality on both the Zambian and Zimbabwean sides of the river. Chat to our safari experts to book your Vic Falls experience.

For many people, fencing protected areas is the best way to secure them. For others, fences represent the devastating closure of corridors for migratory animals. In our second story below, Gail Thomson gives a succinct and brilliant overview of the debate for and against fencing our wild spaces (club members only).

I love lying on my back in the wilderness, staring up at the sky. There is something profoundly peaceful about watching eagles soaring overhead – floating specks in the endless blue vault. In our third story below, we bring you the first part of our two-part series on Africa’s majestic apex predators of the sky.

 

 

Story 1
https://africageographic.com/stories/victoria-falls-the-smoke-that-thunders/
THE SMOKE THAT THUNDERS
Victoria Falls – the smoke that thunders – a breathtaking place of myth, magic, and romance

Story 2
https://africageographic.com/stories/the-great-fencing-debate/
TO FENCE OR NOT TO FENCE
African conservationists are engaged in a furious fencing debate – should protected areas be fenced to conserve wildlife? Club members only

Story 3
https://africageographic.com/stories/african-eagles-part-1/
AFRICAN EAGLES
Africa’s eagles soar through the skies, sharp-eyed and fierce, bringing unexpected death from above to their prey

 


Travel desk TRAVEL DESK UPDATES: 

Fantastic news as 21 African countries have been hauled off the UK’s red list – meaning that travellers returning from these countries will no longer need to enter hotel-managed quarantine on arrival in England. The steps to be taken following arrival will be determined by the traveller’s vaccination status. Read here for more information. The 21 newly removed countries include Botswana, DRC, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia & Zimbabwe. Note that Kenya was previously removed from the red list.

The awakening continues: Uganda Airlines is now flying from Dubai to Entebbe three times a week, and British Airways is flying from Heathrow to Nairobi four times a week.

Uganda twitching: If you yearn to kickstart your list after the enforced Covid hiatus, check out these 10 best spots to go birding in Uganda.


DID YOU KNOW: The biggest insect in Africa is the African goliath beetle (Goliathus giganteus) – measuring up to 17.5 cm in length. It is a scarab that lives in equatorial Africa


WATCH: Meet Nigel, the world’s shortest, fully grown giraffe! (1:03)

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We're the Africa Geographic editorial team – a diverse set of writers, editors, designers and social media natives, all united by our passion for this addictive continent.

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