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 Conservation efforts in northern Kenya are bringing back the world’s most endangered antelope from the edge of extinction. Numbers of hirola in the Ishaqbini Hirola Sanctuary have doubled in just three and a half years. By Northern Rangelands Trust


Hirola

Most people have never heard of the hirola. The fawn-coloured antelope is a shy animal with a long, thin face and spectacled eyes. And yet, this unassuming creature is the centre of what may be one of the most successful conservation efforts in recent history and a wonderful safari attraction. The heroes are the equally unassuming Somali pastoralists who live alongside them on the east bank of the Tana River.

The Abdullah Somali community that runs the Ishaqbini Conservancy in north-east Kenya has always had a fondness for the hirola, whose docile nature has earned it the nickname of ‘the stupid antelope’ in other communities. It is endemic to north-east Kenya and south-west Somalia, but populations have declined by over 80% since 1990. Numerous factors, including disease, hunting and loss of grasslands, have contributed to this.

Ishaqbini is part of a network of 33 community conservancies in northern Kenya, operating under the Northern Rangelands Trust (NRT) umbrella. Together, they manage over 44,000 km² of land, stretching from the Indian Ocean to the Great Rift Valley. They are conserving wildlife, building a safari tourism industry, securing peace, and building resilient livelihoods for rural communities on the back of it.

Sourcing the funding and support they needed through Northern Rangelands Trust, the Kenya Wildlife Service and others, the Ishaqbini community built a 3,000-hectare, predator-proof enclosure in an attempt to protect the last remaining hirola in their area. In August 2012, 48 hirola were herded up from surrounding areas and moved into the sanctuary. This was the first fenced sanctuary on community land in Kenya dedicated to conserving a critically endangered species.

Hirola_calf

The Ishaqbini Conservancy team raised awareness about the plight of the hirola amongst the local people and dedicated conservancy rangers to anti-poaching patrols outside the sanctuary and full-time monitoring of individual hirola herds in the sanctuary. Through NRT, they had access to expert scientific advice to help them shape their conservation and management strategies. But not even they could have predicted the impact that these efforts would have.

In January 2016, an aerial and ground survey revealed how much their hard work had paid off. An estimated 97 hirola were found within the sanctuary, and several heavily pregnant females promise to bring this number into the hundreds very soon. From an initial population of just 48, hirola numbers have doubled in just three and a half years.

“The 50% increase in hirola numbers epitomises the opportunity and strength of the growing community conservation movement across Kenya,” says NRT’s Director of Conservation, Ian Craig. “The future of Kenya’s wildlife is inextricably linked with the development of the communities that live with wildlife. Kenya’s community conservancies are widely recognised worldwide as one of the most innovative models in Africa, empowering people to make informed decisions about managing their land whilst benefitting from wildlife and accessing new and alternative income from safari tourism.”

NRT member conservancies are managed by democratically elected boards and staffed by local people, often mixing ethnic groups that have historically fought with one another. Although the conservancies are still dependent on donor funds, they raise increasingly large sums from commercial activities related to conservation (through NRT Trading Ltd.), county governments and tourism. The profits are being channelled into education, health care and development activities.

With particular thanks to The Nature Conservancy, USAID Kenya and the Kenya Wildlife Service for their support of the hirola project.


Would you like to see hirola in the wild? See our safaris to TSAVO in Kenya – find a ready-made safari or ask us to build one just for you.


 

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