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Greyton is a wee, twee village a couple of hours drive from Cape Town.

Set in the Overberg region, with the Sonderend mountains as a backdrop, Greyton is all oak-lined lanes and itsy, bitsy country cottages. I recently spent a weekend here and it felt like I’d wound back the clock and time travelled into an olde English parish, with white picket fences and farmers’ markets to boot.

Here are my top 10 things to do:

Greyton western cape south africa

1. Sleep in The Treehouse. This place is really rather special – created by interior designer Anna Elisabettini and decked out with a four poster bed, stand alone clawfoot bathtub and gilt gold mirror – it’s Marie Antoinette meets Robinson Crusoe – weird but utterly wonderful. Unfortunately I didn’t get to sleep in the  treehouse, I discovered it because I stayed at one of Anna’s three other options – Mark Cottage, a gorgeous little place with curtained-off alcove beds built on straw bales and a patio shaded by olive trees and vine trellises. Find out more about Anna’s Country Cottages.

greyton accommodation anna's country cottages treehouse the treehouse greyton the treehouse mark cottage greyton greyton mark cottage

Mark Cottage

2. Go to the Saturday morning market. With bunting, hay bales and home-baked pork pies you’ve got all the makings of a village fête at Greyton’s Saturday morning market. Open from 10am-Midday, look out for the deliciously refreshing watermelon juice and make sure to take home a tub of Loret’s red pepper and cashew nut pesto – it’s great mixed with pasta, olives and feta.

Greyton saturday morning market

3. Ogle at Art. It’s everywhere in Greyton, you’ll even find random paintings on the walls of houses – like this cow wearing a father christmas hat… Greyton has become somewhat of a haven for the artistically minded, David Kuijers with his clean cut lines, bold colours and child-like illustrations is one of the more well known, his art studio is well worth a look-in.

greyton south africa

4. Eat Good Food. With freshly baked cakes, local meats, cheeses, jams and breads – Vias Deli is the place to go for a hamper full of food. Stock up and take a picnic to the nature reserve, or, dine out at one of Greyton’s restaurants. Go to The Posthouse for a mean pork belly, Searles rustle up tasty pizzas best enjoyed in the garden, Peccadillos has a blackboard menu of traditional British grub, and Oak and Vigne does moreish sourdough sandwiches – opt for the BLT with homemade mustard mayo.

greyton vias deli

Vias Deli

pecadillos greyton

Peaccadillos

oak & vigne greyton

Oak and Vigne

the posthouse greyton

The Posthouse

5. Ride a Bicycle. Hire some wheels for the day and peddle yourself around Greyton’s side streets, soaking up the scenery at a leisurely, laid-back pace. Mountain bike buffs are in luck, the options in and around Greyton have increased dramatically in the last year thanks to a small band of enthusiasts who have built, cleared and marked many kilometres of track. Join the locals for 2-hour weekend trails leaving from the Oak & Vigne Saturday and Sunday at 7.00am (during summer). Call Tristram on 082 852 4366 or check the notice board next to the trail map at the Oak & Vigne (pictured below).

greyton oak and vigne bicycles

6. Gorge on Choccies. From humble beginnings the Von Geusau Chocolaterie was started in a small cottage in Greyton by a man named Richard von Geusau, formerly a frustrated city accountant with a passion for fine chocolates. Richard learnt the art of chocolate making in Belgium and his artisinal chocolates are high in cocoa with no artificial flavours or vegetable fats. All the chocolates are meticulously made by hand and infused with fresh farm cream, roasted nuts, exotic liqueurs, geranium oil, amongst others. You’ll find his tasting room next to the Oak & Vigne on DS Botha St.

greyton chocolates

7. Taste Local Wine. Greyton has several boutique wine producers on its doorstep and open for tastings with prior arrangement. Andy Mitchell Wines are garagiste-style blends, the first vintage was a Syrah produced in 2003 called Breakfast Rock, named after the highest point of the Greyton to McGregor trail, which starts very close to the cellar. Local Lismore Estate Vineyards was started by Californian Samantha O’Keefe who believes she found paradise and the perfect terroir in Greyton. Her passion combined with vines planted at 300 metres, chilled by the winter snow and nourished by the African summer sun, produce classic cool climate wines which are rich, complex and lovingly hand crafted.

wine tasting greyton

8. Take a Hike. There are many hiking roots starting from the nature reserve including the Upper Gobos walk which trails along the flat hill top, covered with orchids and aristeas at the right time of the year. The path provides wonderful views of the village and the Riviersonderend mountains, with surrounding fynbos and a rock-hopping mission across the Gobos River. Watch out for the birds—plenty of Sugarbirds, Weavers and the orange-breasted Sunbird.

hike greyton

9. Peek-a-Boo at a Doll’s House. Norma Musgrave began collecting and curating dolls houses back in England, she bought her first piece for her 50th birthday and started going to collectors’ fairs and visiting stately homes for inspiration. You can take a look at her creations inside Searles Trading Post, it’s like a scene from a period drama with one room (top left in picture) housing an an old gentleman in a Harris Tweed jacket, monocle in his left eye, busy reading the newspaper.

dolls house greyton

10. Take Home Local Crafts. Greyton is filled with treasures and trinkets – from pretty printed pillow covers to handcrafted rosehip candles and blown-glass suncatchers. Potter around the shops along main road and DS Botha St and you’ll be sure to find something that catches your eye.

crafts greyton

Find out more about Greyton on the Greyton Tourism website

greyton house greyton
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I’m Holly - born and raised in the rural British Counties, my mother began life on a sugar farm in Zululand. After reading Anthropology at university in London, working for a political activist filmmaker in India, and doing a short stint under the bright lights of Bollywood – I decided it was time to return to the motherland. To earn a crust in the name of wanderlust, I finished up a post grad in media and hotfooted around South Africa as a freelance travel journalist.