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Photographer of the Year 2022 Week 11

WEEKLY SELECTION 11 - 2022 PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR

by

Team Africa Geographic

Thursday, 21 April 2022

old camera

Our Photographer of the Year 2022 is open for submissions, with cash prizes of US$10,000 for the winner and two runners-up. Winners and their partners will also join our CEO Simon Espley and his wife Lizz on the ultimate private safari in Botswana.

We are open for entries from 1 February 2022 to midnight on 30 April 2022. Judging for Photographer of the Year will take place throughout those months and for the month of May 2022, and the winners will be announced end May 2022.

Proudly brought to you by Hemmersbach Rhino Force and Natural Selection.

Here are the best submissions for this week 

André Bauma and his ward, Ndakasi – rescued as an infant when the rest of her family was murdered. Bauma and Ndakasi remained close throughout her life, until she died in his arms in 2021. Virunga National Park, Democratic Republic of the Congo. © Marcus Westberg
Shaking it off. Maasai Mara National Reserve, Kenya. © Andrea Castelli
Camel thorn trees and mountains in the early morning light. Sossusvlei, Namibia. © Rian van Schalkwyk
A lone gemsbok crosses impressionistic dunes. Perfectly adapted to its desert environment, the gemsbok can go days without water, thriving in this barren landscape. Namib desert, Namibia. © Dewald Tromp
Relevé in shades of coral. Flamingos sashay through the shallows. São Sebastião, Vilanculos, Mozambique. © Jay Roode
A flock of red-billed queleas against the early morning light. Mana Pools National Park, Zimbabwe. © Jens Cullmann
Africa Geographic Travel
An underground hide provides the opportunity to see eye-to-eye with a pair of endangered reticulated giraffes, aquiline muzzles brushing the red earth in symmety. Ol Jogi Wildlife Conservancy, Laikipia, Kenya. © Julian Asher
A colourful klipfish shows off its good side. False Bay, Cape Peninsula, South Africa. © Peet J. van Eeden
Fear and confusion in the eye of a black rhino before its horns are removed by a team of veterinarians using a chainsaw – an unfortunate but necessary measure to protect rhinos against the illegal wildlife trade. South Africa. © Marcus Westberg
The herd crosses a dry lake. Amboseli National Park, Kenya. © Yaron Schmid
Serval on the prowl, backlit by the setting sun. Maasai Mara National Reserve, Kenya. © Andreas Hemb
An anti-poaching ranger touches a rhino skull in Namibia. The rhino had been shot, but escaped its pursuers and died with horns intact. The horns were removed by Namibian authorities when the body was found, but the remains of the rhino were left where they lay. Namibia. © Marcus Westberg
Africa Geographic Travel
An African wildcat rests in a camel thorn tree, its coat blending in with the tree’s bark. Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, South Africa. © Daniela Anger
A secretary bird feasts on a juvenile mole snake. The bird’s nictitating membrane – which can be drawn across the eye for protection and to moisten it while maintaining vision – is visible. Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, South Africa. © Marijke Claassen
Reading an ancient hand-written Bible in Lalibela – one of Ethiopia’s holiest cities and a site of pilgrimage for many Christians in the country. © Mark Levitin
A ceremonial warrior – a member of the chief’s retinue – performs during the Odwira Festival. Dunkwa-on-Offin, Ghana. © Nyani Quarmyne
Rain-soaked leopard. Maasai Mara National Reserve, Kenya. © Andrea Castelli
Zebras among a sea of chaos at a waterhole. Etosha National Park, Namibia. © Rian van Schalkwyk
Killer instinct. A cheetah, captive bred in a zoo in Canada and relocated to Imire Rhino and Wildlife Conservancy in Zimbabwe as a part of a rehabilitation programme, makes its first-ever kill. After 60 days spent in a boma to acclimatise to its new surroundings, the cheetah underwent a “soft release” exercise, slowly allowing it to transition to the wild. Within 24 hours of its release from the boma, this cheetah managed to prey on a waterbuck calf. Zimbabwe. © Sam Turley
Photographer of the year 2021

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