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Africa Geographic Travel
Vincent Hakizimana – Beekeeping Monitoring Officer for communities near Nyungwe National Park, Rwanda. Beekeeping is and always has been an important source of food and revenue for local people.

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Amazing images + saving private rhinos

Is it necessary to know free-ranging lion populations for a specific area to determine a sustainable trophy hunting quota? I would have thought so. Over the years, teamAG has requested MANY entities, landowners and individuals to demonstrate that their annual quotas are sustainable – i.e. the scientific data proves it is so. But, overall, we have been met with obfuscation, smoke and mirrors and even aggression for daring to ask the questions.

Over the last ten years, the rhetoric from pro-trophy hunting scientists has shifted from claiming that trophy hunting protects more LIONS than national parks do, to protecting more LION HABITAT. Spot the difference?

Based on the available data, we do know that free-roaming lion populations continue to plummet (for various reasons), with a few exceptions, and that trophy hunting supporters continue to claim that the surgical removal of free-roaming males as they play their vital dispersal role is for the good of the species. And we continue to be blocked and even boycotted when requesting access to scientific evidence of lion population stability for specific areas subjected to trophy hunting. Will future generations judge us for our greed, selfishness and arrogance – once free-roaming lion populations crash through the floor and we are reduced to managing fenced lion populations on a metapopulation basis?

If you have access to (and are willing to share) data that shines a spotlight on the stability or otherwise of wild, free-roaming lion populations subjected to trophy hunting, please get in touch with us (confidentiality assured). A luta continua

Keep the passion

Simon Espley – CEO, Africa Geographic


Travel desk TRAVEL DESK UPDATES: 

For many, an African safari is a once-in-a-lifetime adventure. If you’re longing for the African bush and only have one chance to see it all, why not opt for a bumper safari that covers some of the best destinations the continent has to offer?

Southern Africa mega safari – 19 days – US$8,340pps
Be prepared to be swept off your feet with wall-to-wall wildlife action on this iconic southern African safari. You’ll visit Greater Kruger, Cape Town and the winelands in South Africa; Khwai Community Concession and Chobe National Park in Botswana; and Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe – for a once-in-a-lifetime adventure.

Victoria Falls and Hwange – 7 days – From US$2,760pps
This short but iconic safari delivers two of Zimbabwe’s most popular destinations – Victoria Falls and Hwange National Park. Experience the iconic falls and all the activities the raging Zambezi River has to offer, before heading to Hwange for rewarding wildlife viewing in Zim’s largest national park.

From our Scientific Editor – Jamie Paterson

There was jubilation in the Africa Geographic office last Friday when our beloved editor, Taryn, announced the arrival of her baby boy. As a team, we would like to extend our congratulations to Taryn and Pieter on the birth of their son – we are so excited for you both.

With AG’s newest team member needing full-time love and cuddles, I have the honour of introducing our stories each week while Taryn is on maternity leave. But fear not; I will still find the odd opportunity to include a fact of the week when possible!

Fortunately, I am taking over in the middle of our favourite time of year, and the promotion for this week’s gallery practically writes itself. From fierce, testosterone-drive battles and vertigo-inducing mating rituals to iconic backdrops and the innocence of youth, our entrants have captured snapshots of Africa at her finest. Have a look at our gallery below, and you will see what I mean.

With the announcement that the world’s largest rhino farm – including its roughly 2,000 rhino residents – will be put up for auction in mid-April of this year, the conversation about private rhino conservation is now urgent. In our first story below, scientists examine the statistics on private and communal rhino ownership and what it will take to ensure their future.


Story 1
https://africageographic.com/stories/private-rhino/
PRIVATE RHINOS
More than half of Africa’s rhino are in private hands. With rising protection costs, what will it take to build a resilient private industry?

Story 2
https://africageographic.com/stories/photographer-of-the-year-2023-weekly-selection-week-5/
AMAZING IMAGES
Photographer of the Year 2023 entries for Week 5 are here! Enter for a chance to win your share of US$10,000 and a Botswana safari


WATCH: Watch this black-headed heron strike like lightning to kill and eat three Cape sparrows at Leeuwdril waterhole in Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, South Africa (02:58). Click here to watch

To comment on this story: Login (or sign up) to our app here - it's a troll-free safe place 🙂.


HOW TO GET THE MOST OUT OF AFRICA GEOGRAPHIC:

  • Travel with us. Travel in Africa is about knowing when and where to go, and with whom. A few weeks too early / late and a few kilometres off course and you could miss the greatest show on Earth. And wouldn’t that be a pity? Browse our ready-made packages or answer a few questions to start planning your dream safari.
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We're an eclectic pack of safari experts, storytellers, admin and tech nerds and digital natives whose sole mission is celebrating Africa and doing good. We do this by creating life-changing, responsible safaris just for you, publishing informative, factual articles about Africa's incredible natural wonders and raising donations for worthy causes. This MANIFESTO explains our approach to travel and conservation.

Africa Geographic Travel
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