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Africa Geographic
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Africa Geographic Travel

Dragon-like sungazer lizard in danger

Sungazer – it sounds like a cool name for a dragon, and even though these rare lizards look like the mighty dragons from “Game of Thrones”, the fire of their soul may be burned out permanently.

Dear John, our response to your rhino horn auction

Rhino farmer, John Hume, will be auctioning 500kgs of rhino horn online today (23 August 2017). He presents arguments for his rhino horn auction, which Dr Simon Morgan – co-founder of Wildlife ACT, debunks.

Volunteering with anti-poaching rangers in Zimbabwe

As part of our four-month trip around Africa, we decided to spend some of our time volunteering with the International Anti-Poaching Foundation (IAPF) based in Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe, not only support the cause, but in hopes we would also have a unique and unforgettable experience.

New life for elephants in Nyika National Park

In early August, 34 elephants were translocated from Liwonde National Park to Nyika National Park, Malawi, in an effort to bolster the viability of the resident herd and fast-track recovery of critical numbers.

Go Plastic Free with WWF South Africa

WWF South Africa is working to prevent plastic pollution in our oceans through greater education and awareness among consumers and by developing easy-to-use tools to help consumers make responsible decisions and change behaviour.

Saving the cycads from poaching

Cycads are one of the most endangered species on this planet, it’s time we educate ourselves on how to save them from extinction.

Aardvarks taking a beating from climate change

The aardvark, a highlight for anyone on a game-viewing African safari, will become increasingly rare as the world warms and dries, and the consequences go well beyond a decline in aardvark safari encounters.

Protecting the precious pangolins

Pangolins are one of the most threatened animals in the world, and they are so rare that many safari guides will retire without ever having seen one.

Malawi’s conservation success story

With the relocation of 250 more elephants currently underway, and a series of more conservation initiatives in the pipeline, Malawi certainly is an excellent example of how well conservation can work, when combined with scientific research, law enforcement, long-term management and community participation.

Ecotourism: The future of tourism in Uganda

Ecotourism in Uganda looks at conserving and protecting the country’s natural resources found in its national parks, lakes, rivers, swamps, mountains, reserves, preserving those resources in their natural form for future generations, as well and improving the life of the surrounding local communities around.

The economics of ivory is the economics of extinction

We must stop the “heart of darkness” from beating – permanently. Human greed could never limit itself to ivory from natural elephant deaths, so Japan should join the rest of the world in banning the brutal ivory trade. Because only when the buying stops, the killing can, too.

Why Namibia’s desert lions are being killed

Namibia’s desert-adapted lions in the Tomakas region of Namibia are being killed off in a sad whirlpool of human politics, with the recent killing of the last of the famous ‘5 Musketeers’ being one such example.

Video: Capturing spotted cats with camera traps

Africa Geographic recently met up with the Cape Leopard Trust in the Cape, South Africa, to discover more about leopards and to find out why you should sign up for your free MySchool card to help raise funds for their environmental education programme.

Tanzania’s task force tightens noose on international traffickers

Tanzania has managed to revolutionise conventional anti-poaching tactics that were clearly failing, demonstrating how the intelligence-led multi-agency approach to endangered species protection offers an efficient and cost-effective solution to the urgent issue of wildlife security.

Mafia Island’s whale sharks: A brief study of abuse

An international code of conduct for whale shark tourism is voluntarily adhered to by a few. It should therefore be no surprise that most whale sharks that we see around Mafia Island, off the coast of Tanzania, bear the scars and wounds of human disregard and exploitation.

The big dogs protecting wild cats

The majority of cheetahs in southern Africa live outside protected areas on farmland, so it’s essential for the survival of the species to find non-lethal methods of protecting livestock from these predators in order to reduce conflict between farmers and cheetahs.

Conducting a game census safari on horseback

The Ant Collection’s game census safari is an annual event, but this year it was even more essential to assess the grazer and browser populations on the reserve. The most efficient way to count the game is from horseback, and this year 19 guests and 19 guides took part.

Mountain gorilla population bounces back, quadruples to 1000

The largest population of mountain gorillas in the world has grown to four times the size of its once-dwindling number, as poaching has become virtually non-existent among the magnificent apes of Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Massive Noah’s Ark project attracts critics

The plan is to move 6,000 animals during the coming three years – and in the coming eight weeks alone the project will move 50 elephants, 100 giraffe, 900 impala, 300 wildebeest, 50 kudu, 200 zebra, buffalo and eland.

Vulture crisis = Human crisis. Get involved

Africa is experiencing a vulture crisis. The white-backed vulture is one of eight African vulture species that is on the decline. Poisoning and traditional medicine pose a substantial threat to the survival of these ecologically essential birds.

Breaking news: R.I.P Tullamore, the last lion of the 5 Musketeers

Tullamore, the last of the famous ‘5 musketeers’ desert lions of northern Namibia has been killed in the Okongue area, along with a lioness and two cubs, in the ongoing battle between rural cattle farmers and free-roaming lions. The lions were poisoned. Tullamore was the last surviving member of a group of 5 desert lions made […]

Tragic news: Rhino kills ecologist

It is with utmost regret that I inform you that Krisztián Gyöngyi was killed this morning by a rhinoceros in Akagera National Park in Rwanda while out tracking animals in the park. Kris was instrumental in supporting the reintroduction efforts of the black rhino into Friends of Akagera National Park, and was on the ground training rangers how to track and protect them.

ET the aardvark goes home

ET was found and brought to me at ZURI Orphanage in Namibia in August 2015. Small and alien-like in appearance, ET settled in quickly with life on the farm. We have a house full of cats and dogs but settling in an aardvark was a completely different experience. There is very little written about aardvark so we had to learn as we went along.

Rhino horn trade: A considered justification

Rhinos throughout South Africa are being brutally killed for their horns. In this article I would like to focus on some of the positive contributions by the private sector and the trials and tribulations that they face in trying to keep rhinos safe.

Breaking: Rhino mother and calf killed in auction pen

Rhino poachers have struck the auction holding pens in South Africa at iMfolozi’s game capture centre, killing a mother and her calf.  The wild rhinos were captured and auctioned off on Monday, and the mother and calf were sold as a unit.  The mother reportedly had the biggest horn of all the rhinos auctioned that […]

Born Free lions rehomed in South Africa

Recently, Shamwari Game Reserve, along with the Born Free Foundation, orchestrated the rehoming and release of two beautiful Born Free Foundation lions, Ciam and Nelson, into their forever homes at the Shamwari Born Free Big Cat Sanctuaries.

Private game reserves are vital for conservation

Without detracting from the wonderful and critical role that our national parks play in conservation we would like to take an opportunity to focus on the positive achievements of the private sector in this regard.

Southern ground-hornbill: the forgotten one

In Africa, southern ground-hornbills are classified as ‘vulnerable’ by the IUCN, however, those in South Africa are classified as ‘endangered’ on the Red List of Threatened Species as only about 1500 individuals live within the country.

Rhinos to Australia: is this conservation?

There are plans afoot to move rhinos from Africa to Australia as an ‘insurance policy’ and for ‘safekeeping’ in large grass paddocks amongst the gum trees. Is this a valid conservation project (as claimed) or a misdirection of energy and resources by a well-meaning Western society intent on privatising African conservation into their own backyard?

Rhino orphanage to close permanently after security concerns

On May 1st, the Fundimvelo Thula Thula Rhino Orphanage (FTTRO) in Kwa-Zulu Natal, South Africa, made the difficult decision to permanently close its facility after increasing security threats to the animals and staff. This comes after the brutal poaching attack that occurred in February this year where staff were assaulted and two rhino calves were lost after being shot and their horns removed.