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Africa Geographic
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Africa Geographic Travel

Elephants with a purpose

Why did 53 elephants travel more than 1,250 km across three different countries this month? Here’s why.

NEWS WRAP: Scientists create embryos to save near-extinct rhino + Kenya relocates endangered black rhinos

In this week’s news wrap scientists have created embryos to ‘bring back’ a near-extinct African rhino subspecies; Kenya relocates endangered black rhinos to a more secure habitat; The Namibian Minister of Environment and Tourism has responded to the killing of the male desert-adapted lion, Gretsky (XPL 99); an investigation has been conducted on South Africa’s wildlife cryptotrade; the Barberton Makhonjwa Mountains in Mpumalanga, South Africa, have been officially added to the World Heritage Site List; and Zambia’s wildlife paradise and legendary safari mecca of Luangwa Valley may in future partially function as one giant tap for some of Zambia’s growing water needs.

Video: Lions make a comeback

With wild lions under pressure from so many threats, this is a wonderful story of lions being reintroduced to an area that used to have lions.

NEWS WRAP: Three rhinos die at hands of poachers + Botswana MP proposes lifting elephant hunting ban

In this week’s news wrap three rhinos, a mother and two calves, died after a poaching incident; a Botswana MP proposes lifting the elephant hunting ban; an enormous amount of ivory was confiscated after a wide-ranging law enforcement sweep of Yunnan border areas in China; Zakouma National Park’s six black rhinos were dehorned to help reduce the risk of poaching; the DR Congo is considering whether to open up two world-famous national parks to oil exploration; and Zimbabwean police are investigating the illegal hunting of a ‘problem’ elephant bull by two Americans visiting the country on tourist visas.

NEWS WRAP: Desert-adapted lion shot + rhino breeder on verge of bankruptcy

In this week’s news wrap a desert-adapted lion was shot by Namibian authorities after killing livestock; South African rhino breeder, John Hume, has said that he is on the verge of bankruptcy and may have to sell off his 1,626 southern white rhinos; the Namibian NGOs respond to questions from abroad about lion management; the rhino population in Tanzania’s Ngorongoro crater rises above 50; two field rangers were arrested for suspected rhino poaching; a pride of five lions were tested for tuberculosis in the Greater Kruger; and customs officers in Hong Kong arrested a man carrying about R1-million worth of sliced rhino horn.

My fight to save Liberia’s pangolins

Two steps forward, one step back in pangolin conservation. Liberia is a country in West Africa that has overcome civil war, battled through the Ebola crisis and is currently recovering from the impacts. But there is one more issue to confront – the illegal wildlife and bushmeat trade.

Guarding Limpopo National Park’s carnivores

A new carnivore protection ranger force, the Limpopo Lion Protection Team, has been trained and deployed – specifically assigned to support the Greater Limpopo Carnivore Programme and tasked with securing known lion ranges from targeted lion poaching.

Video: Saving the vultures of southern Africa

The loss of vultures could prove catastrophic to our natural environment, since vultures play a crucial role in keeping ecosystems sanitary by picking carcasses clean and preventing lethal diseases from spreading to humans and wildlife.

NEWS WRAP: Kruger lion hunted + lioness saved from snare

In this week’s news wrap a large male lion was trophy hunted in the Greater Kruger National Park; a lioness with cubs was saved after a snare was discovered around her waist; an anti-poaching guard was seriously injured when a buffalo charged him; and two pristine reserves in southern Mozambique, Maputo Special Reserve and Ponta do Ouro Partial Marine Reserve, are set for transformative tourism development.

Southern Mozambique set for major tourism development

Transfrontier conservation NGO, Peace Parks Foundation, has signed a partnership agreement with Mozambique to support the management and development of the Maputo Special Reserve and Ponta do Ouro Partial Marine Reserve.

NEWS WRAP: Canned hunter convicted + escaped Kruger lion captured

In this week’s news wrap a South African canned hunter was successfully convicted; a male lion was darted and captured after presumably escaping the Kruger; two men suspected of being kingpins in a rhino poaching syndicate were arrested; the Zambian government has denied reports that it has authorised the culling of 2,000 hippos in the Luangwa Valley; and the population of mountain gorillas, one of the world’s most endangered species, is on the rise after a population survey was performed in the transboundary Virunga Massif.

Mountain gorilla numbers surpass 1,000

The population of mountain gorillas, one of the world’s most endangered species,, has increased by a quarter to over 1,000 individuals since 2010, wildlife authorities said.

NEWS WRAP: Elephant tramples farmer + fight against rhino poaching continues

In this week’s news wrap a 35-year-old farmer has been trampled to death by an elephant in southern Tanzania; Rhino Project in KwaZulu-Natal shows firsthand how much effort is still going into the fight against rhino poaching; a lactating female elephant has died after being poisoned with cyanide in the Bumi Hills area in Zimbabwe; A South African hunter has been accused of bribing Zimbabwe government officials to shoot an elephant illegally; ranger forces strengthened in Mozambique after more recruits join the ranks; and Japan has partnered the ZimParks and Wildlife Management Authority in its quest to curb the illegal killing if elephants.

The fight against rhino poaching

Project Rhino hosted key national and international media on a visit in Zululand, KwaZulu-Natal to show them firsthand how much effort is still going into the fight against rhino poaching.

Ranger forces strengthened in Mozambique

On 16 May 2018, 39 recruits, of which three are women, celebrated their graduation as rangers during a passing out parade held in the Limpopo National Park, Mozambique. This follows the successful completion of a gruelling eight-week ranger training course presented by the Southern African Wildlife College, that prepared the new recruits for their stand against wildlife crime in the various conservation areas to which they will soon be deployed.

The Karoo Ridge Conservancy: New beginnings

Set in the upper Karoo on the edge of the Great Escarpment, the Karoo Ridge Conservancy is a 5,000 hectare private conservancy founded to restore, protect and safeguard the diverse wildlife, landscape and natural resources of the region.

NEWS WRAP: Leopard kills boy + giraffe kills filmmaker

In this week’s news wrap tragedy has struck in Uganda where a leopard has killed and eaten a three-year-old child in Queen Elizabeth National Park; a habituated giraffe has killed a South African filmmaker; a poacher has been fined R1m fine after rhino horn bust; six wild black rhinos have returned to Chad after a 50-year absence; poachers have shot dead three rhinos inside a Kenyan sanctuary; and another 3.3 tonnes of pangolin scales were seized in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

Wild black rhinos to return to Chad after 50-year absence

An unprecedented collaboration between the South African and Chadian Governments, SANParks and African Parks, is enabling the translocation of critically endangered black rhinos from South Africa to a secure park in Chad on the 3rd May, reintroducing the species to the country after almost fifty years of local extinction.

Fieldwork impressions from Kenya’s Taita Hills – a biodiversity hotspot

In the tropics, fast growing human populations and an increased need for agricultural land clash with the need to protect biodiversity hotspots. Often nature loses out and pristine habitats become fragmented and gradually degraded. How does this affect the animals that have roamed these landscapes before humans started to exploit them? Can they cope with these changes?

NEWS WRAP: Leopard mauls tourist in Namibia + lion pride poisoned in Uganda

In this week’s news wrap a German tourist was mauled by a leopard in Namibia’s Kuiseb Canyon; a pride of eleven lions have died of suspected poisoning in Uganda; according to a Kruger head ranger rhino poaching in the national park is declining, while elephant deaths are up; a ‘problem’ lion was shot near Kruger; wild dogs return to Gorongosa after decades of absence; an elephant has killed a woman in Botswana; and investigations continue in Cameroon following a large discovery of illegal wildlife products hidden in shipping containers bound for China.

One for the diary: Cape Town Adventure Film Festival

The inaugural Cape Town Adventure Film Festival [CTAFF], presented by Orms, will be bringing a selection of both local and international adventure films to one of the city’s iconic indie-cinemas, the Labia Theatre on Orange. Taking place from the 19th to the 28th of April 2018, the schedule comprises of five screening events, as well as an intimate standalone photo exhibition, all events celebrating multiple adventure genres.

NEWS WRAP: Elephants in China endure horrific conditions + wildlife parts allegedly sold on Facebook

In this week’s news wrap a video has emerged showing the horrific conditions being endured by elephants at Beijing Zoo in China; body parts from threatened wildlife are allegedly being widely sold on Facebook; a Chinese man was jailed by a Dutch court for smuggling rhino horn; a pangolin was saved during a poaching syndicate interception in Makhado, South Africa; a pair of rare twin elephant calves thrill conservationists in Tanzania; and a new report helps Uganda take aim at wildlife trafficking.

NEWS WRAP: Tanzania launches largest elephant collaring effort + Britain to ban sale of ivory

In this week’s news wrap Tanzania has launched the country’s largest ever elephant collaring effort to protect its dwindling elephant population; Britain will ban the sale of ivory items regardless of their age in an effort to restrict the illegal ivory trade; Taiwan is to revise laws for a complete ban in ivory trade from 2020; two Chinese nationals have been held in Nepal with 162 kg of pangolin scales; fifty-eight years jail time has been handed down to rhino poachers; a report states that donkey skins are the new ivory; and Kenya’s tourism minister advocates life sentences for ivory possession.

NEWS WRAP: Sudan the rhino passes away + undecided fate for killer lion

In this week’s news wrap Sudan, the last male northern white rhino, has sadly passed away at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya; the fate of lion that mauled a woman to death at Kevin Richardson’s sanctuary remains undecided; African leaders call on EU to shut down ivory trade; and wildlife authorities in Zimbabwe have apprehended a villager in Hwange area for dealing in pangolin.

R.I.P. Sudan – last male northern white rhino

It is with great sadness that Ol Pejeta Conservancy and the Dvůr Králové Zoo announce that Sudan, the world’s last male northern white rhino, age 45, died at Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya on March 19th, 2018.

The story of little Mussa

Meet little Mussa. He was recently rescued from poachers who killed his family for bushmeat. Now he is safely recovering at the Lwiro primate sanctuary, Centre de Rehabilitation des Primates de Lwiro (CRPL), in the Democratic Republic of Congo. However, Mussa is just one of the few lucky chimps to be saved from the hands of poachers.