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Africa Geographic
Wildlife . People . Travel
Shenton Safaris

Tracking with the Ju/’Hoansi Master Trackers in Kruger

The last three Master Trackers of the Ju/’hoanis from Nyae Nyae in Namibia were invited to the Kruger in South Africa to participate in some pioneering trails. They came to display their extraordinary tracking prowess to guests participating in walking trails. This is an account of their journey.

Video: Maasai coming of age ceremony

For the Maasai, the Emuratare is one of their most important ceremonies, and a life-changing milestone for the boys and girls who celebrate their transition into adulthood.

Rock-cut churches in Ethiopia to be documented

In Ethiopia, Christians are still today carving new, free-standing churches from solid rock faces, and now there is a project that is currently documenting this at-risk cultural practice.

Video: Protecting Maasai cattle

The importance of the Maasai’s livestock is mirrored in the way their homestead is constructed, with the cattle enclosure positioned in the centre of it.

Opinion: Are Maasai cattle to blame for overgrazing in Tanzania?

Living with the Maasai has taught me that conservation is not only about animals but is just as much about us humans; that to preserve any one place we have to be mindful of the local communities that live within it and try to understand the way they view the world to be able to work alongside them to protect mother nature.

Grandmothers who harvest salt from river sand

The matriarchs of Baleni use an ancestral technique that has not changed for the last 2,000 years, turning the mineral-rich riverine deposits into ‘white gold’ – Baleni sacred salt.

Elephant ivory and the Japanese hanko stamp

Hanko stamps are the Japanese version of a signature, used throughout Japan to sign deals and important documents, and are made out of a variety of materials, including elephant ivory.

Video: Maasai warriors water their cattle – their wealth

For the Maasai, cattle is considered extremely valuable and form an intrinsic part of their daily lives. Their cattle are at the centre of everything, providing food and materials, as well as playing an important role in their rituals and representing their wealth and status

Himba: Photographing from the shadows

In 2014, I visited a Himba group in the Kunene region in Namibia as a run-of-the-mill tourist with a guide, bringing gifts to the chief to be allowed into his kraal to take photographs. I loved the experience – the women were so beautiful and captivating, and the children so photogenic.

A love story made in Tanzania

I dreamt of him, and of what would await me at his home, his boma, where he lived with his entire family. Nerve-wracking enough to visit your boyfriend’s home for the first time, never mind meeting his parents, grandmother, brothers, sisters, cousins and whoever else lived at the place.

Tanzania: A quick guide to Swahili greetings

Language and everyday culture are intertwined, so it’s worth learning some polite phrases in Swahili, as making the effort to speak another’s language is welcome in any country.

The fascinating people and culture of Uganda

Uganda is a culturally diverse country with over 56 tribal communities featuring a variety of customs and age-old traditions that combine to make cultural tours in Uganda a remarkable experience.

Ghana: a journey to the mecca of West Africa

Whilst the existence of the mosque was first recorded in 1421, there are claims that it’s much older than this. It’s certainly known to be the oldest building in Ghana. Known as “The Mecca of West Africa”, the mosque also houses a Quran which is said to date from 1650 and was a gift from heaven to the Imam for his prayers.

The tribes of Tanzania

Some of Tanzania’s tribes are better known than others – so let’s take a very quick tour of Tanzania’s most famous tribes.

Football for a cause in Zambia

During the month of November 2016, Kafunta Safaris and the Mfuwe Sports Association supported the very first Carnivore Conservation Cup football tournament organized by the Zambian Carnivore Program and sponsored by the National Geographic’s Big Cats Initiative.