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Meeting face to face in Niassa

Ella was doing her home-schooling work the other day,  a lesson on the five senses. “What is a smell you like?”. “Flowers”, she says. “Ok, well what is a smell you dislike?” With no hesitation, “Dead elephants!”. She’s five and

Myths about manta rays

Africa Geographic’s scientific editor, Tim Jackson, catches up with Andrea Marshall, director of the Marine Megafauna Association in Mozambique, and asks her about the top five myths that loads of people seem to believe about mantas. Myth 1: When giving birth, mantas

New 50/50 Episode: 30th July 2012

TURTLES OF BANGLADESH During Kali Puja, an annual festival in Bangladesh, sacrifices are made to Kali, goddess of power. It’s a time of celebration and feasting and on the top of the menu is turtle. Many thousands of turtles are slaughtered indiscriminately

Visiting Save the Elephants in Kenya

The gunshot makes no sound. I’m only sure it’s been fired when the matriarch’s knees buckle under the weight of her one and a half-ton elephant mass. “In this kind of operation every minute matters,” the vet tells us. “No

Gorilla Doctors hold out hope for injured baby boy in Volcanoes National Park

Being wildlife veterinarians, the Gorilla Doctors are often challenged to determine the seriousness of an illness or injury in a gorilla by visual observation alone. Clinically, it’s ideal to perform tests and physical examinations on ailing patients to make definitive

Tracks of Giants – kayaking the mighty Zambezi to the half-way mark!

Yesterday afternoon, after an exciting day of kayaking down the mighty Zambezi River, we reached the Waterfront on the edge of Livingstone, Zambia. It brought to an end another incredible leg on the TRACKS expedition – 232kms down one of

Caracals count too: mesopredator research in the Cederberg

On a recent trip to the Cederberg with my 9-year-old son, I arranged to meet a young researcher working for the Cape Leopard Trust. I was keen to chat to her about the work of the CLT in the area,

Top 10 Picture of the Day entries – June 2012

Here’s our editor’s selection of the top ten picture of the day entries from June 2012: Submit your own best African wildlife image!  The best of the bunch for the month will be published in the magazine and the top

African Painted Dogs VS Crocodile

A mighty battle went down between two of Africa’s great carnivores, the African Painted dog and a crocodile. The crocodile already had a dead impala in the water when Wildlife ACT monitor Michelle Swemmer got to Bucanda dam on Thanda

50 / 50 Episode 2, 18 June 2012

Shark drama Once or twice a year, reports of shark attacks hit the media, often graphically headlined with phrases such as “Blood everywhere” or “Killer shark strikes again!” But no-one celebrates the remaining 364 days, when these apex predators that

Tracks of Giants: thank you and farewell Namibia

By Ian Michler It took us 27 days and 1,490 km to pass through Namibia. And as it so often happens on long journeys, individual days tend to merge the passage of time. As we left the Dobe border post

50/50 is back! New episode coming on 11 June 2012…

Take a look at this exciting lineup: Vodka Bears The practices of bear baiting and dancing bears were outlawed in Eastern Europe almost 12 years ago and we thought we’d seen the end of cruelty to bears… Not so. Deeper

Wild Kid shortlist: who is the wildest kid of them all?

Watch these video auditions of two of the shortlisted kids to be the WildKid tv series presenter: Graham Wiggill lives on a game farm in the Timbavati. Life in the wild has certainly never been boring for Graham and his

Cheetah Outreach – moving into the future

The first week of June is going to be an exciting week for Cheetah Outreach. They’ll be relocating from their current site at Spier wine farm to their new home, Heartland’s Paardevlei site in Somerset West.  I caught up with

Video highlights: Cheetah cub birth

The Africam broadcast of this event, which took place on May 2nd, was a tribute to the work being done at the Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centre in the name of cheetah conservation. The birth was the first installment in what

Ian Player: man of the wilderness

Growing up brought with it a certain disappointment for me. Perhaps because, as a child, I always believed that the hero wins, that the good guy comes through in the end. And even if he dies it’s always for a

Tracking endangered black rhinos in Africa’s heartland

There is concern that despite fact that humans have reduced the critically endangered black rhino numbers by well over 90 percent in the last century, rhino’s may actually be suffering the effects of more recent population increases in some reserves.

Turtles – something you won’t forget!

Our latest video about protecting the precious turtles of Mozambique.

World’s First Dedicated Rhino Orphanage Founded

Press Release: South Africa is to be home to the first specialist, dedicated, non-commercial care-centre for baby rhinos orphaned by the shocking trade in poached rhino horns. The Wildlife & Cultural Centre at Legend Golf & Safari Resort in Limpopo

Cause an Uproar!

In support of Lion conservation, the National Geographic Society has agreed to donate 10 cents to lion conservation in Botswana every time this YouTube video is viewed. Share it with your friends and Cause an Uproar! Also make sure to

Africa’s Painted Dogs need your help

One of South Africa’s lesser known and rarely seen endangered species is our enigmatic African Painted Dog (Wild Dog). Few South African’s have had the honour of witnessing these elusive but magnificent creatures, and at present rates few ever will.

Of Sharks and Other Trophies

South Africa’s weekend press carried a sickening story of some angler posing triumphantly over a dying shark he had minutes earlier hauled from the waters around Mossel Bay. No doubt using the most sophisticated equipment to catch what is apparently

Baby Gorilla Rescued in DRC

In a victory for conservation, a poached baby gorilla was recently rescued by an undercover team in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Thanks to a tip-off, three rangers managed to rescue the baby gorilla by posing as interested buyers,

The Transparency and Reflectiveness of Zoos

As social institutions with a history that dates back to 3500 BC, zoos are simultaneously transparent and reflective. Transparent in that there is no pretence to offering a  “natural experience” on its own terms as suggested by game parks. Reflective

Rhino Infographic

Today is World Rhino Day – people across the planet will take a stand against the illegal trade in Rhino horn. Editor of Safari, Paul Steyn, will join a peaceful protest outside Cape Town Parliament between 11.30am and 13.00pm today.

World Rhino Day. What are you doing?

The distressing killing of rhino has captured the attention of South Africans who have voiced strong opposition to their cruel and unnecessary slaughter. However, many people still feel helpless, and unable to do something small to make a difference. Here’s

News from Niassa: A family in the wild

“Some people feel the rain, others just get wet” Bob Dylan We like to feel the rain. We also sometimes get wet, as for nine months of the year we sleep in a Mozzie dome tent on a platform under

Fracking is not an option: I will die for Water

Oom Johannes and Antoinette Pienaar are the “Shamans” of the Karoo in South Africa – they live in total isolation, hunting and gathering as their ancestors once did. They are respected traditional healers, using rare herbs they find in the

End the mockery now

Developments over the last week in South Africa’s rhino poaching crisis clearly indicate that trophy hunting is one of the largest contributing factors to the ongoing slaughter. This is the cue for the professional hunting bodies, both in this country

You be the judge?

It’s a tricky question, and one that crops up all too often in the wild. Should you, as a human, use your power to save an animal in distress? Instinct and compassion say yes, but Ian Michler suggests that more

Shame on us!

For so many of us involved in the wildlife, conservation and ecotourism industries in South Africa, it’s a very shameful period right now. In addition to dealing with the rhino poaching scourge, the appalling practices of canned hunting and the

Working Mothers

Leopards are solitary cats by nature. They are comfortable on their own. Female leopards lead less solitary lives than males, as they bear young and spend much time with their cubs. Male leopards have little to do with raising their

Running with the Dogs

2010 has been a good year for African wild dogs in some of the most northern of Botswana’s wildlife areas. At least three different packs raised pups in the Linyanti and Selinda concessions. Wild dog movements become somewhat restricted during

Some Encouraging Signs from the Northern White Rhinos

It has been a while since we sent news from the Ol Pejeta Conservancy and the northern white rhinos. We decided that, instead of reporting on the same thing every two weeks, we would wait until there was some significant

The Cost Of Predation

Life can be tougher for large carnivores than it may at first appear. Africa’s big cats are equipped with dangerous claws, long, sharp teeth, and powerful muscular limbs to enable them to kill their prey. On the other hand prey

Predator breeder and trader arrested

Well done to the South African police – they may very well have made another crucial breakthrough in their fight against the organised crime syndicates targeting the country’s wildlife. On Friday 23rd July, an individual that is extremely well known

Whatever happened to the lionesses with manes

A few months ago I posted a story with pictures about female lions with manes. The lionesses I wrote of were all seen at Mombo, in the Okavango Delta. Since then I have visited Mombo again, and was lucky enough

Of water, trees and nutrients

This year the Okavango River is carrying more water than it has for many years. On a recent flight over the Delta I was struck by the impact the high water levels are having on trees. Much of the water

Rhino syndicate hit hard

A victim of poaching, as published in Africa Geographic September 2008. Photo: SAPS By all accounts, rhinoceros poaching in southern Africa has reached alarming levels. During this past weekend alone, four rhinos were poached in South Africa, one being shot

Big open spaces for the Northern Whites

A lot has happened since our last update which was sent on April 20. We sadly said goodbye to Berry White, our expert rhino whisperer, who returned home to the UK. Three of the northern whites were given access to

Ivory traders get tusked

Ring one up for the elephants! The most recent CITES meeting in Doha, Qatar has drawn to a close and amongst the numerous resolutions, there was a significant victory for elephants and those opposed to the ivory trade. The proposals

Reunited At Last

We have very exciting news to share this week! Last Saturday, on the 20th of March, Sudan finally got his chance to go out and rejoin Najin and Fatu in their current 400 by 400 meter enclosure. As reported last

Gentle Introductions at the Bomas

  Warming Up for the Re-Introductions Fatu and Najin, our two female northern white rhinos, have been getting extra contact with Sudan this week in an effort to slowly re-introduce the animals in preparation for the April release into the

A Busy Week at the Bomas

Progress with the Fence Fence completion for the larger enclosure is set for the end of this month. It looks like we have a long way to go but the posts are going in. Stringing the wires will only take

Just another rainy and muddy week on the Ol Pejeta Conservancy!

The construction of the fence – for the rhinos’ new 701.5 acre enclosure – is ongoing. Our team is working as hard as they can to stay on schedule for the release of the rhinos the first week of April.

Release Date Set, Boy’s Time Out and More Rain

Release Date Set We are now in a position to confirm dates for the next phase of this project. In this next phase, Najin and Fatu will be reunited with Sudan and will have their first steps into what will

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